The Plan

Analyzed, Collective Results of November 2013 Workshop Maps

Looking across 115 citizen created maps to understand what citizens want their future Buffalo Niagara to look like.

AnalysisCollectiveResultsAs we continue to collect citizen-created scenario maps through workshops on the road, we are also looking across all of the maps to identify general themes which will be used to construct alternative scenarios for our region.
These themes will be developed from the choices citizens made on their maps:

  • The type of chips used and their frequency
  • Where housing and jobs are located  based on chip placement
  • Percentage of development within the urbanized area
  • Transportation modes and patterns
  • Natural and farm land preservation
  • Principles citizens used to guide their decisions

Below are the results of an analysis across all of the maps from the Community Congress Workshops this past November.


Participants were asked: Which places will you protect and maintain?

Key Findings:

  • Farmland protection and open space conservation were strong themes in principles and in practice (mapping).
  • 23 percent of maps protected everything outside the urbanized area.
  • Controlling sprawl was a prominent principle for almost half the tables

What the Maps Tell Us So Far: What will you protect and maintain?


Participants were asked: Which communities will you keep as they are today?

Key Findings:

  • Citizens preserved villages with strong Main Streets (e.g. East Aurora, Orchard Park, Lewiston, Youngstown,  Hamburg and Williamsville).
  • Some highlighted the whole urbanized area.

 

What the Maps Tell Us So Far: Which communities will you keep as they are today?


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Urban Center Chips

Key Findings:

  • Downtowns in Buffalo and Niagara Falls were prioritized. More than 90 percent of maps focused revitalization there.
  • Translates to 62 percent of new jobs and 11 percent of new housing in downtown areas.
  • Lockport, Amherst, and the Tonawandas were seen by some as potential centers of urban growth.


WhichPlacestoCreate_UrbanCenter


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Village Center Chips

Key Findings:

  • Participants placed these chips in order to strengthen existing village centers around the region.
  • Revitalizing neighborhoods in urban areas like the East Side.
  • Emphasizing “mixed use,” “density,” and “walkability.”
  • 23 percent of new homes and 13 percent of new jobs.
  • The most popular place type. Overall, participants traded for and played 88 percent more of the “VC” chips than they were given in their starter set.


WhichPlacestoCreate_UrbanCenter


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Traditional Neighborhood Chips

Key Findings:

  • Many were placed in older urban neighborhoods
  • Where vacant land and distressed housing  may prevail. Inner ring suburbs, villages which are experiencing the first signs of decline and disinvestment.
  • Nearly three fifths of new housing and 5 percent of new jobs in traditional neighborhoods
  • Revitalization of existing areas emphasized in principles

WhichPlacestoCreate_Traditional-Neighborhoods


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Suburban Style, Single Family Residential Chips

Key Findings:

  • Placed at the edge of the urbanized area, filling in between existing suburban developments.
  • Revitalizing urban areas, such as Niagara Falls and neighborhoods on the Buffalo Cheektowaga border.
  • Citizens used SF chips sparingly.
  • Trading in 45 percent for denser forms of development – accounting for only 7 percent of new housing.

WhichPlacestoCreate_SuburbanStyleResidential


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Exurban Rural Residential Chips

Key Findings:

  • Placed across the rural towns of the Buffalo Niagara region, or the edge of the urbanized area.
  • Only 2 percent of new homes at one per acre or more.
  • The least popular place type.
  • 85 percent of chips traded away for more dense development and many maps with none.

WhichPlacestoCreate_ExurbanResidential


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Suburban Strip Retail Chips

Key Findings:

  • Placed almost exclusively within the urbanized area, often near highways and clusters of existing strip retail.
  • Only six percent of new jobs in “suburban strip” developments.
  • Participants preferred urban forms of retail development.
  • Trading in nearly three-fifths of SS chips for other place types.

WhichPlacestoCreate_SuburbanStripRetail


Participants were asked: What kind of places do you think make sense to create and where should they be located?

What Participants did with their Office Industrial Chips

Key Findings:

  • Placed in existing industrial areas or “brownfields” especially…South Buffalo, Lackawanna, Tonawanda and Niagara Falls.
  • Placed in many suburban areas suggesting office development near highway infrastructure.
  • Job creation was a priority with fewer of these chips traded away even if participants weren’t fond of the place type.

WhichPlacestoCreate_OfficeIndustrial


Participants were asked: Would you build new roads & highways across the region?

What Participants did with Road/Highway Routes

Key Findings:

  • At the Buffalo-Fort Erie crossing of the Niagara River to relieve major road and highway bottlenecks.
  • Transit Road, Interstate 90, the “Blue Water Tower.”
  • Most tables added no highway infrastructure at all.
  • A few suggested removing  highway infrastructure, Like the Humboldt, Niagara Thruway, Scajaquada.

GettingAround_RoadsHighways


Participants were asked: Would you build new transit/pedestrian routes across the region?

What Participants did with Transit/Pedestrian Routes

Key Findings:

  • Map principles gave heavy emphasis to “connections” and improvements to transit with many specific places to link.
  • Transit links from Downtown Buffalo drawn by roughly half to UB North Campus, Buffalo airport, and Niagara Falls.
  • Nearly all maps added transit and pedestrian connections. And more than three-quarters added 20 miles or more.

GettingAround_TransitPedestrian


Participants were asked: Would you build new trails & bikeways across the region?

What Participants did with Trails/Bikeway Routes

Key Findings:

  • Connecting waterfronts, parks, rural communities and natural assets.
  • All maps added trails or bikeways: on average 69 miles.
  • Half of tables put trails on Erie and/or Ontario lakefronts.

GettingAround_TrailsBikeways